Florida Reef Tract Coral Disease Outbreak: Media Resources

Gena Parsons
Communications and Outreach Manager
Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary
305-809-4694
Gena.Parsons@noaa.gov


Photos

 

diver swimming around a coral reef

Buoyancy is key to preventing the spread of stony coral tissue loss disease.

Credit: Greg McFall/NOAA

Download Image

a diseased brain coral with fish swimming around

Jennifer Stein, FWC biologist, places a brain coral into a mesh collection bag as part of a coral rescue mission ahead of the disease front in the Lower Florida Keys.

Credit: FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute

Download Image

a diseased brain coral with fish swimming around

Signs of stony coral tissue loss disease on Symmetrical Brain coral (Pseudodiploria strigosa).

Credit: Florida Department of Environmental Protection

Download Image

Tissue loss on a colony of Great Star Coral

Tissue loss on this large colony of Great Star Coral (Montastaea cavernosa) is nearly total.

Credit: Florida Department of Environmental Protection

Download Image

Tissue loss on a colony of Great Star Coral

A small colony of Great Star coral (Montastraea cavernosa) showing signs of stony coral tissue loss disease.

Credit: Florida Department of Environmental Protection

Download Image

diseased brain coral

The recent death of the brain coral in the foreground indicates the diseased coral next to it will likely suffer the same fate. Looe Key, July 7, 2018.

Credit: Greg McFall/NOAA

Download Image

diver identifying coral

Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary marine biologist Lonny Anderson identifies a healthy, rare pillar coral sqawning in July 2018 near Looe Key.

Credit: Greg McFall/NOAA

Download Image

close up view of coral that has been re-attached

Coral Rescue cactus coral - Cactus coral is among the species being collected from reefs ahead of the disease front in the Lower Florida Keys as part of the coral rescue mission aimed at preserving genetic diversity.

Credit: Nathan Burkebile/FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute

Download Image

two people working placing coral in collection tank

Coral Rescue KML - Rob Ruzicka, FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, and Jennifer Moore, NOAA Coral Recovery Program, survey the Keys Marine Laboratory collection from the initial coral rescue mission in response to the stony coral tissue loss disease outbreak.

Credit: Nathan Burkebile/FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute

Download Image

Diver observing a healthy Grooved Brain coral

Rescued corals are mounted with epoxy on terracotta tiles to prevent their tissue from being damaged by touching the bottom of the tank.

Credit: FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute

Download Image

Diver observing a healthy Grooved Brain coral

Diver observing a healthy Grooved Brain coral (Colpophyllia natans) in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.

Credit: Florida Department of Environmental Protection

Download Image

woman standing on a boat preparing pillar coral gametes for gene banking

During the July 2018 coral spawn, Linda Penfold with The South-East Zoo Alliance for Reproduction and Conservation prepares pillar coral gametes for gene banking in partnership with the Florida Aquarium.

Credit: Chad Stolka/NOAA

Download Image

series of images showing the progression of the stony coral tissue loss disease

Time series photos over five days show the rapid tissue loss on an infected coral.

Credit: Karen Neely/Nova Southeastern University

Download Image

diver creating a trench filled with chlorinated epoxy

A scientist creates a trench filled with chlorinated epoxy to treat a colony of Mountainous Star coral (Orbicella faveolata) impacted by scleractinian tissue loss disease.

Credit: Nova Southeastern University

Download Image

scientist handeling coral fragments in a water tank

Mote Marine Laboratory on Summerland Key developed a micro-fragmentation and fusion method to speed the growth of crucial reef-building species.

Credit: Mote Marine Laboratory

Download Image

close up view of coral that has been re-attached

Mote Marine Laboratory on Summerland Key developed a micro-fragmentation and fusion method to speed the growth of crucial reef-building species.

Credit: Mote Marine Laboratory

Download Image

diver bagging a coral for rescue

Coral Rescue Rob Ruzicka - FWC Fish and Wildlife Institute diver Rob Ruzicka bags one of several species of coral targeted for rescue to maintain genetic diversity in the wake of the stony coral tissue loss disease outbreak.

Credit: Nathan Burkebile/FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute

Download Image

diver using a hammer to remove healthy coral from a reef

Coral Rescue Stephanie Schopmeyer - FWC Fish and Wildlife Institute diver Stephanie Schopmeyer uses a hammer to remove a healthy coral from a reef in the Lower Florida Keys. Corals susceptible to stony coral tissue loss disease are being rescued and banked for genetic diversity for future restoration efforts

Credit: Nathan Burkebile/FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute

Download Image

Videos

 

Diver Alysha Brunelle applies chlorinated epoxy to the firebreak and active disease margins on a diseased Mountainous Star coral (Oribicella faveolata) as an experiment to determine if it will slow or stop progression of stony coral tissue loss disease. Credit: Brian K. Walker/Nova Southeastern University

Download Video

A diseased Mountainous Star coral (Oribicella faveolata) with score marks approximately 5 cm from the diseased margins created by a chisel that indicate where firebreaks will be cut. Credit: Brian K. Walker/Nova Southeastern University

Download Video

Researcher Brian Walker uses the underwater grinder method to create a 1 cm wide and 1 cm deep firebreak along the scored marks around a disease margin. Credit: Jeff Beal/Nova Southeastern University

Download Video

This Pillar Coral (Dendrogyra cylindrus), an endangered species near extinction in the Florida Keys, shows early signs of stony tissue loss disease. Credit: Nick Zachar/NOAA

Download Video

Diver Alysha Brunelle applies chlorinated epoxy to the firebreak and active disease margins on a Great Star coral (Montastraea cavernosa) as an experiment to determine if it will slow or stop progression of stony coral tissue loss disease. Credit: Brian K. Walker/Nova Southeastern University

Download Video

Researcher Brian Walker uses the hammer and chisel method to create a 1-2 cm wide and 1 cm deep firebreak along the scored marks around a disease margin. Credit: Alysha Brunelle/Nova Southeastern University

Download Video

Science divers evaluate stony corals in the Lower Florida Keys as a tissue loss disease progresses down the Florida Reef Tract. Credit: Nick Zachar/NOAA

Download Video