Florida Reef Tract Coral Disease Outbreak: Media Resources

Gena Parsons
Communications and Outreach Manager
Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary
305-809-4694
Gena.Parsons@noaa.gov


Photos

Coral Rescue Photos

rescued corals in a pool

Rescued corals in quarantine tanks at Florida Aquarium’s Apollo Beach Conservation Center are monitored closely for signs of stress from being transported. They will remain at the aquarium until long-term care facilities are able to house them.

Credit: Ananda Ellis/FWC

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diver pointing out diseased coral

During a technical exchange in December 2018, a CONANP representative from compares stony coral tissue loss disease on the Florida reef with a similar disease outbreak at Xcalak Reefs National Park in Mexico.

Credit: Emma Doyle/Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute

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diver swimming around a coral reef

Buoyancy is key to preventing the spread of stony coral tissue loss disease.

Credit: Greg McFall/NOAA

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a diseased brain coral with fish swimming around

Signs of stony coral tissue loss disease on Symmetrical Brain coral (Pseudodiploria strigosa).

Credit: Florida Department of Environmental Protection

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diseased brain coral

The recent death of the brain coral in the foreground indicates the diseased coral next to it will likely suffer the same fate. Looe Key, July 7, 2018.

Credit: Greg McFall/NOAA

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scientist handeling coral fragments in a water tank

Mote Marine Laboratory on Summerland Key developed a micro-fragmentation and fusion method to speed the growth of crucial reef-building species.

Credit: Mote Marine Laboratory

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Rescued corals

Rescued corals from the Dry Tortugas National Park await shipment to their temporary homes with Association of Zoos and Aquariums partner organizations.

Credit: Carly Dennison/ University of Miami

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symmetrical brain coral

A symmetrical brain coral (Pseudodiploria strigosa) on Cedral Reef a popular dive site in Cozumel, Mexico, is affected by stony coral tissue loss disease.

Credit: Gregory S. Boland

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diver surveys coral

Nova Southeastern University researcher Dr. Karen Neely conducts a survey for colonies affected by stony coral tissue loss disease.

Credit: Nova Southeastern University

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diver applies an antibiotic paste to a diseased colony of great star coral

A diver applies an antibiotic paste to a diseased colony of great star coral on Molasses Reef in Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.

Credit: Karen Neely/Nova Southeastern University

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diver creating a trench filled with chlorinated epoxy

A scientist creates a trench filled with chlorinated epoxy to treat a colony of Mountainous Star coral (Orbicella faveolata) impacted by scleractinian tissue loss disease.

Credit: Nova Southeastern University

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Videos

 

Intervention expert Emily Hower applies an antibiotic paste to a lesion in hopes of slowing or arresting the progression of stony coral tissue loss disease. Credit: Karen Neely/Nova Southeastern University

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Diver Alysha Brunelle applies chlorinated epoxy to the firebreak and active disease margins on a diseased Mountainous Star coral (Oribicella faveolata) as an experiment to determine if it will slow or stop progression of stony coral tissue loss disease. Credit: Brian K. Walker/Nova Southeastern University

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Researcher Brian Walker uses the underwater grinder method to create a 1 cm wide and 1 cm deep firebreak along the scored marks around a disease margin. Credit: Jeff Beal/Nova Southeastern University

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This Pillar Coral (Dendrogyra cylindrus), an endangered species near extinction in the Florida Keys, shows early signs of stony tissue loss disease. Credit: Nick Zachar/NOAA

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Diver Alysha Brunelle applies chlorinated epoxy to the firebreak and active disease margins on a Great Star coral (Montastraea cavernosa) as an experiment to determine if it will slow or stop progression of stony coral tissue loss disease. Credit: Brian K. Walker/Nova Southeastern University

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Researcher Brian Walker uses the hammer and chisel method to create a 1-2 cm wide and 1 cm deep firebreak along the scored marks around a disease margin. Credit: Alysha Brunelle/Nova Southeastern University

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Science divers evaluate stony corals in the Lower Florida Keys as a tissue loss disease progresses down the Florida Reef Tract. Credit: Nick Zachar/NOAA

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